Controlling Type 2 Diabetes

If you have been recently diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes, you probably have been the recipient of a lot of advice and information related to your condition. While a diagnosis of Type 2 Diabetes is not the end of the world, it is still a matter that you should take very seriously. In fact, if you are unable to get it under control, the disease can progress to the point of making you very ill, make your life quite miserable to live, or even hasten your death.

Type 2 Diabetes: Care and Control for the Newly Diagnosed

If you have been recently diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes, you probably have been the recipient of a lot of advice and information related to your condition. While a diagnosis of Type 2 Diabetes is not the end of the world, it is still a matter that you should take very seriously. In fact, if you are unable to get it under control, the disease can progress to the point of making you very ill, make your life quite miserable to live, or even hasten your death.

The good news is that there is hope. Depending on how far the disease has progressed, there are things you can do to reduce your symptoms, lifestyle changes that are well within your reach, which can allow you to lead an active, happy, and healthy life doing all the things you love to do.

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What is Type 2 Diabetes?

Diabetes is characterized by the body’s inability to produce and/or use insulin. Type 1 diabetes is caused by an auto-immune response that eventually shuts down insulin production altogether, while type 2 is about the body’s inability to use insulin efficiently. Type 1 diabetics are often diagnosed in youth and will be insulin dependent for the rest of their lives. They make up only 5-10% of all diabetes sufferers. Type 2 diabetics make up the majority, as 90% or more of all diabetes diagnosis is type 2. Type 2 diabetes is generally diagnosed in adulthood. It is not hereditary (though some risk factors may be) and is easily preventable.

Type 2 diabetes is caused by a physiological anomaly in the pancreas resulting in weakened insulin production, or insulin deficiency. Insulin’s purpose is to regulate the level of glucose (sugar) in your blood. The energy from the foods we eat become sugar in our blood and insulin is needed to break it down so it can be used by the body to fuel our activity. Type 2 diabetics are either insulin resistant or do not produce enough insulin, which creates an insulin deficiency. Either way, the insulin your body is producing is not doing what it’s supposed to do, resulting in either very high or very low blood sugar. The extremes of these scales can elicit severe feelings of illness, nausea, dizziness, confusion, and many more disturbing symptoms you’d probably rather not have. 

While there is nothing that can be done to prevent type 1 diabetes, type 2 can be prevented, or at the very least delayed, by adopting healthy eating habits, maintaining a healthy weight, and eating sensibly.

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What you can do right now - today

While you may find your diagnosis upsetting, scary or even difficult to believe – after all, you may not have even had any symptoms. But even if you don’t feel sick, knowing what you’re up against should move you to action.

Living with type 2 diabetes means that there are some things you must adjust to your day-to-day routine. First and foremost, you need to start taking better care of yourself, and you can’t put it off any longer. The truth is, many people with type 2 diabetes go on to live happy and fulfilling lives. You can too.

Listen to your doctors, keep your appointments

Your doctors, nurses, and caregivers will help you manage your medications (if you are prescribed any) and will continue to monitor your disease over time. Once you leave the office, however, the onus of self-care is on you. Test your sugars (if directed to do so) in the way that your doctor suggests, and take all medications as it is prescribed. Make a point of telling your doctor and pharmacist that you have type 2 diabetes, just in case there are medicines you are already taking that may affect your blood sugar.

Read and research

You may need to do some reading and research in order to find out what foods are most and least beneficial for you. This doesn’t mean that you need to feel deprived, but you should understand that eating a lot of refined sugar is going to affect you adversely. This may mean limiting or cutting out processed foods, bread, and sweets.

Learn about hidden sugars

While sugar in and of itself is a good thing to avoid, there are lots of other foods that naturally contain a high level of glucose, and will turn to sugar in your system. Many seemingly “healthy” foods have hidden sugars, and the only way you will know is by reading labels diligently. Some synonyms for sugar include corn syrup, maltose, malt syrup, high-fructose corn syrup, glucose-fructose, agave, brown rice syrup, dextrose, honey, lactose, invert sugar, evaporated cane juice, maltodextrin, molasses, sucrose – they are all sugar! If you like a sweet taste in your coffee or tea, try using stevia instead. A plant-based sweetener that is 600 times sweeter than sugar, stevia has zero calories and is totally natural. Artificial sweeteners like aspartame or sucralose can cause many other health issues, so try to limit or eliminate their use altogether.

Switch out fresh fruit for fruit juice

Sugary drinks and fruit juices are all high on the list of things to avoid. Alternately, choose fresh fruit and plain or diet soda to quench your thirst, and if you’re craving orange juice, opt instead for a fresh orange. You’ll get your fresh orange taste without all the added sugar and calories. For example, an average sized orange is about 47 calories and less than 8 grams of net carbs. An 8oz glass of orange juice, by comparison, has 22 grams of sugar and zero fiber, delivering a whopping 26 grams of carbs and leaving you wanting more.

Watch your carbohydrate intake

While carbs are the building blocks that fuel your body, eating the right kinds of carbs will make all the difference. If you get your carbs from fresh vegetables and fruit, you will never feel deprived – in fact, you’ll be able to eat more than you did before because the foods are much more easily digestible, more nutrient-dense, and so will satisfy your hunger more efficiently. Eating sugary or starchy carbs will drive your blood glucose through the roof, and will then bottom out quickly, leaving you feeling weak and sick.

Healthy eating made simple

Follow these simple guidelines to help you make significant and lasting changes:

  • Eat a variety of foods, including whole grains, vegetables, fruits, healthy fats and lean meats
  • Avoid high-fat meals or food items
  • Don’t overeat
  • Eat smaller meals, but eat more often: every 3 hours, you should have something
  • Don’t skip meals
  • Prepare your meals and snacks ahead of time if you can, so you aren’t tempted to eat sugary or high-carb treats
  • Buy a cookbook especially for type 2 diabetes for yummy meal ideas that you and your family will love

Get moving!

Physical activity can help you lose weight, de-stress, and feel great! It also helps you to use the calories you ingest more efficiently, stimulating your metabolism and helping all of your body’s functions to work better. Any kind of physical activity will lower your blood glucose, and that’s exactly what you need to do. So get out there: walk the dog, join a gym, sign up for a yoga class, or just resolve to be more active through the day by choosing the stairs over the elevator, walking to the store instead of driving, or parking at the far end of the lot. Little changes add up to big results over time.

Take The FCR

The FCR is a natural supplement that combines three powerful medicines: cordyceps, fucoidan, and reishi mushroom. Each of these substances on their own is known to help regulate blood glucose for those who suffer from type 2 diabetes, but all three together gives you a powerful punch that will support many other aspects of your good health. For instance, The FCR strengthens the immune system, stimulates the endocrine system and lowers blood pressure. It is a natural anti-inflammatory, improves liver function, and protects against illness, fatigue, and some cancers.

If you have recently been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, try The FCR today. It’s a formidable ally in the journey towards your healthiest self.

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